Missouri State University

Electrical Engineering

Electrical Engineering (for 2009-2010)

Electrical engineers are involved in channeling natural resources into uses for society, such as heating, lighting, home appliances, consumer products, computing, sensing, control, and communication. They contribute to systems and devices for power, instrumentation, measurement, communication, management, manufacturing, transportation, etc. They are primarily concerned with the processes of generation, transmission, transformation, control, and utilization of energy or information.

                

Electric Power Engineering

Electrical Engineers that work in the field of electric power are involved with the generation, transmission, distribution, and control of electric energy. Electric power engineers work with both traditional energy sources, such as coal, oil, and nuclear and hydroelectric power, as well as renewable energy production technologies, such as wind and solar energy.  With the increasing interest in renewable or “green” energy technologies, electric power engineers will have to design the future wind and solar powered electric generating facilities, as well as develop the “smart” or intelligent electric grid that will allow the electric energy produced by these renewable sources to efficiently and reliably reach the homes and factories that depend on electric power.

Students who are interested in electrical engineering begin by completing the Freshman Engineering Curriculum, thus obtaining fundamental skills and an overview of the various engineering degree programs, before entering the Electrical Engineering program. They commit to the Electrical Engineering degree program after exposure to the different career options. Once in the program, students gain knowledge in the main areas of electrical engineering, learn to use hardware and software tools in numerous laboratories, and apply engineering concepts in both freshman and capstone design experiences. They may supplement their education with participation in design competitions, professional societies, work internships, research experiences, and more.

The curriculum exposes students to the breadth of electrical engineering and allows them to pursue electives in several areas or to emphasize a specialty. The areas are defined as circuits, electronics, power, communications-signal processing, controls, electromagnetics, optic/devices, and computer engineering.

 
Circuits and Electronics

Electrical Engineers that work in the field of electronics design and build electronic devices and systems ranging from computers to sensors and gauges on airplanes and spacecraft. Virtually every device used in modern life includes some form of electronic devices or circuits. Some Electrical Engineers involved in electronics design and fabricate the integrated circuit “chips” that make up the electronic building blocks for most electronic devices. Other Electrical Engineers involved in electronics use these integrated circuit “chips” to design larger and more complex systems and devices.

In circuits and electronics, courses provide a study of basic electrical devices – energy sources, resistors, inductors, capacitors, diodes, and transistors – and their interconnection in operational networks. Circuit design and analysis techniques are covered with both analog and digital applications.

In power, courses emphasize the design and applications of motors, generators, transformers, distribution systems, high-voltage devices, and power electronics.

In communications-signal processing, courses include concepts required for the characterization and manipulation of information-bearing signals, modulation systems, wireless networks, image processing, and detection hardware. 

 
Controls

Electrical Engineers involved in the area of control, design the circuits and systems used to control the operation of many types of processes and devices, including industrial plants, airplanes, and a wide range of other process and devices ranging from radar antennas to chemical processes. Electrical engineers working in the control field also design and develop robots to work in factories, explore hazardous environments, or generally perform tasks that are too dangerous or difficult for humans.

In controls, courses emphasize the design and application of circuits and systems to automatically monitor and regulate devices, machines, and processes. Advanced technologies using digital control, intelligent processing, neural networks, and programmable logic controllers are included.

In electromagnetics, courses provide instruction in the interaction, propagation, and transmission of high-frequency waves and signals through space and in conductors. Topics include grounding and shielding, antennas, microwaves, and systems. 

In optics/devices, courses provide study of solid state materials, electronic devices, and optoelectronics.  Applications are micro-fabrication, telecommunications, computing, instrumentation, lasers and fiber optics, sensing, and smart technologies. 

In computer engineering, courses are offered in digital logic, digital hardware, and microprocessor systems.

Other studies are available for embedded computer systems, computer architecture, integrated circuits, computational intelligence, networks and software engineering, and software security and reliability.

 

Mission Statement

The Cooperative Electrical Engineering Program strives to contribute to the state, nation, and world through the education of outstanding professionals and leaders in engineering. Our educational focus is on a broad, rigorous education in all areas of electrical and computer engineering with significant hands-on experiences. The program will provide students with an understanding of engineering problem solving at all levels and an appreciation for engineering as a profession. 

Cooperative Electrical Engineering Program Objectives
  • Technical competency: Graduates will have a sound knowledge of the fundamentals in electrical engineering that allows them to analyze and solve technical problems, to apply hardware and software tools, to create and evaluate technical products, to learn independently, and to succeed in the workplace and graduate school.
  • Engineering perspective: Graduates will be capable of understanding complex projects, including their evolution and abstraction, and the optimization of associated decisions and risk, both locally and globally.
  • Professional skills and knowledge: Graduates will have the ability to communicate well in both oral and written form, interact in teams, manage and lead technical projects, manage their careers, and conduct themselves with an understanding of ethics, economics, and intellectual property.
Cooperative Electrical Engineering Program Outcomes

Consistent with the program educational objectives listed above, the Missouri S&T Electrical Engineering Program graduate will have the ability to:

  • Apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
  • Design and conduct experiments, as well as analyze and interpret data
  • Design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints, such as those in economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability aspects
  • Function on multi-disciplinary teams
  • Identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
  • Acknowledge and understand the importance of professional and ethical responsibility
  • Communicate effectively
  • Understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and social context
  • Recognize the need for, and be able to engage in, life-long learning
  • Retain knowledge of contemporary issues
  • Use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.
  • Maintain an awareness of engineering and professional issues related to complex projects.
Cooperative Electrical Engineering Admission Requirements

All entering students must satisfy the enrollment restriction for the program. Entering freshmen desiring to study Electrical Engineering will declare a major in Engineering and be advised by faculty in the Cooperative Engineering Program at Missouri State University. Students will apply for admission to the Cooperative Electrical Engineering Program after completing the courses in the Freshman Engineering Curriculum. Students must have a minimum GPA of 2.5 after completing the Freshman Engineering Curriculum in order to be admitted to the Cooperative Electrical Engineering program.

Cooperative Electrical Engineering Credit Requirements

For the Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering, a minimum of 130 credit hours is required. These requirements are in addition to credit received for algebra, trigonometry, and basic ROTC courses. An average of at least two grade points per credit hour must be obtained. At least two grade points per credit hour must also be obtained in all courses taken in Electrical Engineering.

General Education Requirements

Each student's program of study must contain a minimum of 21 credit hours of course work in general education and be chosen according to the following rules:

  1. All students are required to take one American history course, one economics course, one humanities course, and English 110. The history course is to be selected from History 121, History 122, or Political Science 101. The economics course must be Economics 155. The humanities course must be selected from the approved lists for Art, English, Foreign Languages, Music, Philosophy, Speech and Media Studies, or Theater.
  2. Depth requirement: 3 credit hours must be taken in humanities or social sciences at the 200 level or above and be selected from the approved list. Students may receive humanities credit for foreign language courses in their native tongue only if the course is at the 300 level or higher. All courses taken to satisfy the depth requirement must be taken after graduating from high school.
  3. The remaining two (3 credit hour) courses are to be chosen from the list of approved humanities/social sciences courses and may include one communications course in addition to English 110.
  4. Any specific departmental requirements in the general studies area must be satisfied.
  5. Special topics, special problems, and honors seminars are allowed only by petition to, and approval by, the student's department chairman.
Cooperative Electrical Engineering Curriculum

The Cooperative Electrical Engineering Program is characterized by its focus on the scientific basics of engineering and its innovative application; the underlying theme of this educational program is the application of the scientific basics to engineering practice through attention to problems and needs of the public. The necessary interrelations among the various topics, the engineering disciplines, and the other professions as they naturally come together in the solution of real world problems are emphasized as research, analysis, synthesis, and design, and presented and discussed through classroom and laboratory instruction.

Sophomore Engineering Curriculum

Courses First Semester

Credits

 

Courses Second Semester

Credits

El Eng 1511,3,4  Circuits 1

3

 

El Eng 1211,3,4,7 Introduction to Electronic Devices

3

El Eng 1521,3  Circuit Analysis Lab

1

 

El Eng 1221,3,4 Electronic Devices Lab

1

Cp Eng 1111,3,5 Introduction to Computer Engineering

3

 

El Eng 1531,4,6  Circuits 2

3

Cp Eng 1121,3  Computer Engineering Lab

1

 

MTH 3031 Differential Equations

3

MTH 3021 Multivariate Calculus

3

 

IDE 140 Statics and Dynamics

3

PHY 2041  Physics 2

5

 

CSC 125  Introduction to C++ Programming

4

Total

16

 

Total

17

Junior Engineering Curriculum

Courses First Semester

Credits

 

Courses Second Semester

Credits

El Eng 2531,3,6,7 Electronics 1

3

 

El Eng 2711,3,6 Electromagnetics 1

4

El Eng 2551,3,6,7 Electronics 1 Lab

1

 

   

El Eng 2151,3,6 Linear Systems 1

3

 

El Eng 2171,3 Continuous Linear Systems

3

El Eng 2161,3,6 Linear Systems 1 Lab

1

 

El Eng 2181,3 Continuous Linear Systems Lab

1

MTH 533 Linear Algebra

3

 

Electrical Engineering Elective A7,9

 3

COM 115 Principles of Speech

3

 

MTH 345 Statistics for Science and Engineering

3

Hum/SS Elective2        3

 

 ENG 3218 Writing II

         3

 Total

 

17

 

 

 Total         17

Senior Engineering Curriculum

Courses First Semester

Credits

 

Courses Second Semester

Credits

Electrical Engineering Power Elective1, 3,6,10

3

 

Electrical Engineering Elective C7,9

3

Electrical Engineering Power Elective Lab1, 3,6,10

1

 

Electrical Engineering Elective E12

3

El Eng 235 Controllers for Factory Automation

3

 

El Eng 392 Senior Project 2

3

Electrical Engineering Elective D7,11

3

 

Hum/SS Elective13 (upper level)

3

El Eng 391 Senior Project 1

1

 

Free Elective13

3

Free Elective13

2

 

Assessment14        0

Hum/SS Elective2

 

         3

 

Total        15
 Total

16 

 

   
  1. A minimum grade of "C" must be obtained in MTH 261, 280, 302, and 303, PHY 203 and 204, Cp Eng 111, 112, El Eng 151, 152, 153, 121, 122, 215, 216, 217, 218, 253, 255, 271, 272, and the Electrical Engineering power elective. Also, students may not enroll in other courses that use these courses as prerequisites until the minimum grade of "C" is obtained.
  2. All electives must be approved by the student's advisor.  Students must comply with the general education requirements with respect to selection and depth of study. These requirements are specified in the current catalog.
  3. Students who drop a lecture prior to the last week to drop a class must also drop the corequisite lab. 
  4. Students must earn a passing grade on the El Eng Advancement Exam I (associated with El Eng 151) before they enroll in El Eng 153 or 121 and 122.
  5. Students must earn a passing grade on the Cp Eng Advancement Exam (associated with Cp Eng  111) before they enroll in any course with Cp Eng 111 and 112 as prerequisites.
  6. Students must earn a passing grade on the El Eng Advancement Exam II (associated with El Eng 153) before they enroll in courses that have El Eng 153 as a prerequisite.
  7. Students must earn a passing grade on the El Eng Advancement Exam III (associated with El EngG 121) before they enroll in El Eng 153 and 253 or other courses with El Eng  121 as a prerequisite.
  8. ENG 321 is preferred, but students may replace ENG 321 with ENG 210, 221, or 310.
  9. Electrical Engineering Electives A, B, and C must be chosen from the El Eng 205 and 208, 207 and 209, 225, 231 or 235, 243, 254, Cp Eng 213.
  10. The Electrical Engineering Power Elective may be satisfied with El Eng 205 and 208 or El Eng 207 and 209.
  11. Electrical Engineering Elective D must be a 300-level El Eng or Cp Eng course with at least a 3-hour lecture component. This normally includes all El Eng and Cp Eng 3xx courses except El Eng 281, 282, and 283 and El Eng or Cp Eng 391 and 392.
  12. Electrical Engineering Elective E may be any 200 or 300-level El Eng or Cp Eng course except El Eng 281, 282, and 283 and El Eng or Cp Eng 391 and 392.
  13. Students are required to take five hours of free elective credit in consultation with their academic advisors. Credits that do not count toward this requirement are deficiency courses (such as algebra and trigonometry) and extra credits from courses meeting other requirements. Any courses outside of engineering and science must be at least three credit hours.
  14. All Electrical Engineering students must take the Fundamentals of Engineering Examination prior to graduation. A passing grade on this examination is not required to earn a B.S. degree; however, it is the first step toward becoming a registered professional engineer. This requirement is part of the Missouri S&T assessment process as described in Assessment Requirements found elsewhere. Students must sign a release form giving the University access to their Fundamentals of Engineering Examination score.
Emphasis Areas for Electrical Engineering

Note: The following emphasis areas identify courses from which a student may opt to develop an emphasis area. It is not required that students obtain an emphasis specialty within electrical engineering.

Circuits and Electronics

  • El Eng 254-Electronics II
  • El Eng 256-Electronics II Laboratory
  • El Eng 351-Advanced Electronic Circuits
  • El Eng 353-Power Electronics

Communications-Signal Processing

  • El Eng 243-Communication Systems
  • El Eng 341-Digital Signal Processing
  • El Eng 343-Communications Systems II
  • El Eng 345-Digital Image Processing

Computer Engineering

  • Cp Eng 213-Digital Systems Design
  • Cp Eng 214-Digital Engineering Lab II
  • Cp Eng 254-Electronics II
  • Cp Eng 215-Computer Architecture
  • Cp Eng 319-Digital Network Design

Controls

  • El Eng 231-Control Systems
  • El Eng 235-Controllers for Factory Automation
  • El Eng 331-Digital Control
  • El Eng 335-Advanced PLC

Electromagnetics

  • El Eng 225-Electronic & Photonic Devices
  • El Eng 371-Grounding & Shielding
  • El Eng 373-Antennas and Propagation
  • El Eng 377-Microwave and Millimeter Wave Engineering & Design
  • El Eng 379-Microwave Principles for Mixed-signal Design

Power

  • El Eng 205-Electromechanics
  • El Eng 208-Electromechanics Lab
  • El Eng 207-Power System Analysis & Design
  • El Eng 209-Power System Analysis & Design Lab
  • El Eng 305-Electric Drive Systems
  • El Eng 307-Power Systems Engineering
  • El Eng 353-Power Electronics